New and Sparkly



We fired up my daughter's new insulin pump over the weekend.

Our four year warranty was up and, while the pump still worked, its appearance led us to believe it might be living on borrowed time:





The screen protector was peeling off.

And so was the paint.

It was still effectively giving insulin, but the idea of having no warranty was making us nervous.










We've had very few issues with Animas pumps over the past 12 years, but when we have, having one under warranty has unfailingly led to an overnight replacement.

That's hugely reassuring, especially considering how long it took to order a new one from scratch.






Granted this wasn't an emergency since my daughter's pump was still perfectly operational, but it took about six weeks between my first call to inquire about a replacement and its arrival on our doorstep. The process began with two different phone calls with questions for me, then doctor's orders, insurance authorization (which was the longest process), another phone call to discuss our copayment and the shipping details, and then actually getting it shipped out.

The possibility of reverting to multiple daily injections for even a fraction of that time is not appealing to us.

The new pump is silver, and sparkly all over, with no chipped paint. The screen protector is intact and clean.


And we expect to have a reliable source of insulin delivery for four more years.

 


 

Reading is Fundamental


My daughter had a few late afternoon and evening lows last week.

When she's out and about, she carries juice boxes, glucose tabs and smarties. When she's home she prefers something different. There are occasional seasonal choices in the fridge like fresh apple cider or high-test lemonade leftover from a cookout. Usually, though, the home juice of choice is orange juice. She pours four ounces into her pink sippy cup and waits for the low to turn around. Nine times out of ten, unless she's under 50 or been exercising heavily, those 4 ounces bring the low up within 15 minutes and life goes on.



Last week, not so much. The lows seemed slower to respond. If it was dinner time and she hit 70 after 15 minutes, we'd eat and subtract some bolus insulin. Otherwise, she found herself adding more juice, or a little snack of fruit or crackers to make sure she came all the way up.

A couple of seemingly sticky lows in one week was weird. And a nuisance, especially at dinner time. What was going on? Maybe it had to do with impending full moon or some other such mysterious and passing variable. Or maybe something had changed and my daughter's new normal involved closer to 20 carbs per low.

Then I walked into the kitchen as she poured the last of the orange juice into her cup:


I accidentally bought low-carb orange juice. I don't drink it and my husband hadn't noticed when he slugged it down still half asleep in the mornings.

I read a lot of labels: cereals, snacks, bread, starches and countless other packages are fully assessed before they're consumed. I missed this one. Which explains why those lows wouldn't come up.